Mindfulness

#54: Bringing Relationship back into Mindfulness with Amaranatho

In my second conversation with Amaranatho, we talk about how to bring mindfulness more meaningfully into our lives and, specifically, our relationships. Westerners already tend towards individualism, and gravitating towards intensive meditation practice can sometimes reinforce the preference of Westerners for individualism, while failing to allow us to develop the valuable skills of mindfulness within social contexts.

This builds on a similar theme of what contemporary practitioners of insight meditation (from Theravada Buddhism) must contend with when they import a monastic model into modern life. Amaranatho also discusses the ways in which he thinks psychotherapy can complement meditation, and how both can help us to become more fulfilled, self actualized human beings.

Amaranatho’s bio:

Amaranatho was a Buddhist monk for 15 years who has spent long periods alone, dealing with uncertainty and contemplating the deeper questions in life. He has a degree in AI, been a world explorer and is a supervisor and mentor to mindfulness teachers, facilitators and spiritual leaders. He works one to one with contemplatives and meditators that are stuck in their practice you can find more at www.amaranatho.com

As a mindfulness based executive coach he helps leaders, teams and organizations to stay calm and connected in complex situations so they can awaken to their true potential, by using the PlayfulMonk approach he developed more at www.playfulmonk.net

#53: Coming back to Awareness with Amaranatho

This week I speak with Amaranatho, who was a Buddhist monk for 15 years under the guidance of a very well respected teacher in the Thervada Buddhist tradition, Ajahn Sumedho. Ajahn Sumedho was one of the original Western disciples under Ajahn Chah, one of the great masters of the Thai Forest tradition of the 20th century. At many points in our conversation you can hear through Amaranatho’s voice the simplicity and clarity of Ajahn Chah’s repeated instructions to “rest in the one who knows,” to recognize awareness itself as the ground of all experience.

As Amaranatho was a Buddhist monk for 15 years and has now been “in the world” as a mindfulness based executive coach, he is in a unique position to offer insight into this question in which I’m increasingly interested: how to interpret the profound wisdom teachings of Theravada Buddhism (a monastic tradition) to those of us living life as a “householders,” in the modern world? Which of these practices can serve us well? And what should be modified or discarded?

That’s a big question and Amaranatho and I only scratched the surface of it, but I think you’ll enjoy the depth of wisdom he had to share.

Amaranatho’s bio:

Amaranatho was a Buddhist monk for 15 years who has spent long periods alone, dealing with uncertainty and contemplating the deeper questions in life. He has a degree in AI, been a world explorer and is a supervisor and mentor to mindfulness teachers, facilitators and spiritual leaders. He works one to one with contemplatives and meditators that are stuck in their practice you can find more at www.amaranatho.com

As a mindfulness based executive coach he helps leaders, teams and organisations to stay calm and connected in complex situations so they can awaken to their true potential, by using the PlayfulMonk approach he developed more at www.playfulmonk.net

#37: The Science of Self Mastery with Dr. Judson Brewer

Guest Bio:

Judson Brewer MD PhD is a thought leader in the field of habit change and the “science of self-mastery”, combining nearly 20 years of experience with mindfulness training with his scientific research. He is the Director of Research at the Center for Mindfulness and associate professor in Medicine and Psychiatry at UMass Medical School and a research affiliate at MIT.

He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, trained US Olympic coaches, and his work has been featured on 60 Minutes, TEDMED, Time, Forbes, BBC, NPR, Businessweek and others.

A psychiatrist and internationally known expert in mindfulness training for addictions, Brewer has developed and tested novel mindfulness programs for habit change, including both in-person and app-based treatments (Eat Right Now, Unwinding Anxiety and Craving to Quit).

He has also studied the underlying neural mechanisms of mindfulness using standard and real-time fMRI.

His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Fetzer Trust among others. Dr. Brewer founded Claritas MindSciences to move his discoveries of clinical evidence behind mindfulness for eating, smoking and other behavior change into the marketplace.

Shownotes:

Coming soon.

Links:

Personal Website of Judson Brewer

#029: Mindfulness in Recovering from Addiction with Mindfulness Teacher Paul Garrigan

In this episode I speak with mindfulness teacher and addiction and recovery conselor Paul Garrigan on how the practice of mindfulness can support people in recovering from addiction.
Guest Bio:
Paul Garrigan is the Mindfulness Program Manager at Hope Rehab Center in Thailand. Originally from Dublin, Ireland, Paul struggled with addiction to alcohol since he was a teenager.
 
Paul spent his twenties in England as a nurse, before living in Saudia Arabia and eventually Thailand. Paul moved to the Kingdom of Smiles to study meditation at Buddhist temples. Cultivating mindfulness was the beginning of the end of Paul’s battle with addiction. Eventually, Paul got a grip on his addiction to alcohol. In 2010, he published a memoir “Dead Drunk: Saving Myself from Alcoholism in a Thai Buddhist Monastery.” 
Paul continues to write about addiction and recovery, in addition to working with people struggling with addiction at Hope Rehab in Thailand. 
Links:

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